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Six Questions With Wordsmith

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Six Questions With WordsmithSix Questions With Wordsmith

Welcome to “Six Questions With…,” a series of interviews with emerging artists, musicians, and bands focusing on the music scene and how they live within it. It started as a quick, fun project, but has quickly gained serious interest, so we’re making this a permanent feature on the site. Over time, the questions may change, but the sentiment will stay intact. This is a way for independent artists to be discovered by new fans on a global scale.

Within in each post, you will find all of their social media links, and also either a link to their music, or the ability to stream at least one of their tracks or videos, depending on the availability.

We hope you enjoy this series, and if you know anyone that might be interested in being part of it, please have them reach out to us for more information.

Next in the hot seat is Baltimore-based rapper, musician, and entrepreneur Wordsmith. We have not had the privilege of  featuring Wordsmith here on the pages of Indie Minded, so we are thrilled to bring you this short interview. If you’re not familiar with him, sit back and enjoy! This is what is great about this series – the discovery of new music.

For those who may not be familiar, please tell us about your music: the type of music you play, where you are from, and how you got started?

I consider my brand of hip-hop as conscious commercial. My songs are melody driven/catchy like radio records, but I never make throw away music. Each song has a message about life and covers blue collar living over a flashy lifestyle most of us know nothing about. In regards to where I’m from Baltimore, MD is home, but I also have citizenship in Germany where I was born. My start in this business began in 2009 when I opened up my company NU Revolution Entertainment. Unlike most artists, I was thirty years old when I first entered this game instead of my early twenties.

As an artist, how do you define success?

In my opinion you can’t get caught up in being all over the radio and TV to justify your success. There are tons of great independent musicians like myself that make decent money yearly without the backing of a major label. You’re successful when music 100 percent supports your family. When you don’t have to hold down a 9 to 5 anymore and music is the breadwinner – you have made it!

What do you find to be your greatest struggle when it comes to the music business?

Promotion, Promotion, Promotion. It is the beast that makes or breaks a single or an album. You can have a great song that know one hears if it’s not promoted properly. It’s a constant struggle to get notoriety and awareness in this business especially when you don’t sound like most of the Hip Hop artists out right now. I remember when there was West Coast, East Coast and Down South Hip Hop and they all got their fair share of support. I’m all for the game evolving, but in the process the variety in Hip Hop has been lost and I feel we are forced to like one current sound and that’s Trap Music. I don’t have an issue with Trap, but there are other forms of Hip Hop and talented artists out here besides that.

If you could only play ONE of your songs for the rest of your career, which one would it be?

I would have to say “Fill the Space” from my new album Perspective Jukebox, available now!

Who do you consider your greatest influences?

A Tribe Called Quest, Redman, EPMD, Nas, Eminem, Public Enemy, Coldplay, Metallica and Alina Baraz.

Outside of music, what do you like to do that you feel contributes to the creativity that you tap into for your music?

Being a good father is the highest on my list as it pushes me musically to be successful for my kids. Other than that, Baltimore has a serious homeless problem so I try to use my accomplishments in music to push my agenda of working with other companies to support homeless matters.

Website | Facebook | Instagram | @Wordsmith

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